Fish Shaped Cosmetic Container

Fish Shaped Cosmetic Container

Fish Shaped Cosmetic Container

Fish Shaped Cosmetic Container

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Fish Shaped Cosmetic Container

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Photo by Sara Mostafa Kamel

Artefact Details

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Gallery number: N/A

Period: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Saqqara

Size: 11 cm

Material: N/A

N/A

Ostracon, head of king to right, wearing helmet colored

Ostracon, head of king to right, wearing helmet colored

Artefact Details

Gallery number: N/A

Period: N/A

Place of discovery: Luxor (Valley of the Kings)

Size: L. 42 cm

Material: Limestone

N/A

Mosaic with Medusa

Mosaic with Medusa

Mosaic with Medusa Artefact

Mosaic with Medusa

Mosaic with Medusa

Artefact Details

Gallery number: N/A – Ground Floor

Period: N/A

Place of discovery: N/A

Size: N/A

Material: N/A

N/A

Head of a Gaul

Head of a Gaul

Head of a Gaul

Head of a Gaul

Head of a Gaul

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 34 – Ground Floor

Period: Roman Period (c. 30 BC– AD 306)

Place of discovery: Unknown

Size: H 37.50 cm

Material: Marble

Gauls inhabited in the region of ancient Roman Empire, specifically the territory corresponding to modern France, Belgium, southern Netherlands, Switzerland, northern Italy and Germany to the west of the Rhine River.

The Gaul is characterised by his facial features, his stiff hair and his moustache. This head is considered one of the most impressive pieces of art of its era. Although much of the head is broken off, it is still easy to recognise the warrior’s sense of pain conveyed through the contracted eyebrows, turned head and dishevelled hair.

Buchis Bull Stela of Ptolemy V

Buchis Bull Stela of Ptolemy V

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 34 – Ground Floor

Period: Ptolemaic Period, reign of Ptolemy V Epiphanes (c. 204–180 BC)

Place of discovery: Southern Upper Egypt, Armant, Bucheum

Size: H 73.00 cm W 50.00 cm D/L 16.00 cm

Material: Limestone, gold, pigment (unspecified)

Dedicated by Ptolemy V to the god Buchis, the sacred bull who identified with the war god Montu that was worshipped at Armant, this round-topped stela was discovered in the underground necropolis known as Bucheum, which was devoted to the burials of Buchis’s earthly embodiments. Stelae such as this one was discovered in their thousands and were marked for each burial in the Bucheum.

Buchis was first mentioned in Egyptian religion during the 30th Dynasty in the reign of Nectanebo II. He was represented as a white bull with a black face, but according to the classical author Macrobius, his colour changed each hour of the day.

This stela is protected at the top by a winged sun-disk, representing Horus of Edfu, under which a scarab and a djed pillar (the symbol of the god Osiris) is flanked by two uraei and two crouching jackals. The body of the stela is separated from the upper register by the hieroglyphic symbol of the sky. The second register depicts Ptolemy V seen in an Egyptian king’s robes, offering the hieroglyphic sign for fields to a statue of Buchis Bull, who is crowned with a sun-disk with two uraei and double feathers. The gilded statue is placed on a gilded base and protected by a hovering falcon, an allusion to the sky and sun gods Horus and Re, holding a fan and a shen-ring (symbol of infinity).

Five horizontal lines of hieroglyphic text in the third register provide details of the dedication of the stela, made by Ptolemy V and his consort, Cleopatra I, in the 25th year of his reign.

Stela of Canopus Decree in Honor of Ptolemy III

Trilingual Stela of Canopus Decree in Honor of Ptolemy III

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 49 – Ground Floor

Period: Ptolemaic Period, Ptolemy III Euergetes I (c. 246–221 BC)

Place of discovery: Kom el-Hisn (Imu; Momemphis), Temple of Sekhmet-Hathor

Size: H 204 cm – W 93 cm – L 70 cm

Material: Limestone

The Decree of Canopus is a trilingual inscription in Egyptian hieroglyphs, Demotic and Greek. It commemorates a great assembly of priests held at Canopus to honour Ptolemy III Euergetes, his wife Queen Berenice and Princess Berenice. It is the second earliest instance of a series of trilingual inscriptions, the most famous example of which is the Rosetta Stone.

This round-topped stela is decorated with a frieze of stars that runs around the top of the stela’s lunette. It depicts a winged sun-disk with pendant uraei and shen-ring (symbol of infinity) hanging from their bodies beside the names of Horus Behedet and the cartouches of the king and the queen. Below is a register containing sixteen divinities and kings facing to the centre (eight on each side), where the innermost figure on the proper right side is Ptolemy III. Beneath are one hundred and ten horizontal lines of inscription; the top twenty-six of which are in hieroglyphs; the second twenty are in the Demotic script, while the final sixty-four are in Greek. The inscription describes various subjects such as military campaigns, famine, governmental organisation and Egyptian religion in Ptolemaic Egypt. It mentions the king’s donations to the temples and his support for the Apis and Mnevis (Mer-wer) cults. It declares the deceased princess Berenike as a goddess and creates a cult for her. Finally, it orders the decree to be incised in stone or bronze in both hieroglyphs and Greek, and to be displayed in the temples.

This stela inaugurates the most accurate solar calendar known to the ancient world, with three hundred and sixty-five and quarter days per year. The upper-right corner of the stela is missing a piece, and the right edge of it is damaged.

Coffin of Petosiris

Coffin of Petosiris

Anthropoid Coffin of Petosiris

Coffin of Petosiris

Anthropoid Coffin of Petosiris

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 50 – Ground Floor

Period: Ptolemaic Macedonian Period/Argead Dynasty (c. 332–305 BC)

Place of discovery: Middle Egypt, Tuna el-Gebel, Necropolis, Funerary House No. 21 Petosiris

Size: H 39.00 cm W 53.00 cm D/L 193.00 cm

Material: Pinus halepensis wood (conifers), glass

The tomb of Petosiris, the High Priest of god Thot in Hermopolis, is a unique example of this era. It has the appearance of a small temple from the Graeco-Roman period. The scenes from the tomb are a mixture of Egyptian, Greek and Persian influences and are of outstanding technical quality and rich symbolism.

The tomb holds the stone sarcophagus of Petosiris, in which two wooden anthropoid coffins were found. The innermost coffin depicts Petosiris wearing a divine beard and a long wig. The large eyes and bronze eyebrows that take the form of wedjat eyes, are inlaid with coloured glass. The body, wrapped in a mummiform garment, is decorated from chest to ankles with five vertical lines of inlayed hieroglyphic inscriptions, topped by a hieroglyphic sign of sky decorated with a band of stars, of which two-thirds is now missing. The hieroglyphic inscriptions and the band of stars are inlaid with glass coloured red, yellow, green, blue and white to imitate fine stones and precious materials. The inscriptions bear the name and the titles of Petosiris and the formula from Chapter 42 of the Book of the Dead, helping the deceased to overcome the difficulties of his journey towards the afterlife. The wood of the coffin shows some cracks and a small piece of the outer layer of wood is missing on the left side at the feet.

Statue of a Ptolemaic King

Statue of a Ptolemaic King

Statue of a Ptolemaic

Statue of a Ptolemaic King

Statue of a Ptolemaic King

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 49 – Ground Floor

Period: Ptolemaic Macedonian Period/Argead Dynasty, reign of Alexander IV (c. 317–310 BC)

Place of discovery: Thebes East, Karnak Temple (Ipet-Isut)

Size: H 280.00 cm W 61.00 cm D/L 106.00 cm

Material: Red granite

The mixture of Hellenistic Greek and traditional Egyptian styles are well illustrated in this colossal statue of a Ptolemaic king. The sculpture of the body is beautifully rendered, with elegantly and simply modelled idealized elements typical of Egyptian art.

The nemes crown is sharply turned at the shoulders and set back on the forehead to display the curls across the forehead. The face of the king is modelled in Hellenistic style, but maintains an idealised approach to the portrait. The round eyes are heavily rimmed and the brows are simple and his Grecian nose is long, narrow and straight. The mouth is narrow but full and the median line of the mouth is visible on the bottom lip, and he has a prominently rounded chin. He is wearing the royal shendyt kilt and stands with his left leg is forward, arms by the sides holding the traditional enigmatic cylindrical objects. This statue remains unidentified due to the lack of inscriptions.

Colossal Statue of an Official Named Horemheb

Colossal Statue of an Official Named Horemheb

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 49 – Ground Floor

Period: Ptolemaic Period (c. 304-30 BC)

Place of discovery: Delta Western, Kom Geif (Naukratis; el-Nibeira; el-Niqrash), Great Mound

Size: H 360.00 cm

Material: Granite

Horemheb was an official who served under the first Ptolemies. He had control over the Greek colony of Naukratis, which was established in the 26th Dynasty on the Canopic branch of the Nile river as trading post for the Greeks in Egypt. Herodotus mentions that King Amasis gave Naukratis to Greek colonisers, but there is an evidence that it was already founded under King Psamtek I.

Although this statue dates to the Ptolemaic Period, its iconography and style is almost exclusively Egyptian. It depicts Horemheb with his left leg forward, arms by his sides, holding the traditional enigmatic cylindrical objects. His wig has rounded ends on the back of his shoulder, leaving his ears uncovered and he is wearing the shendyt kilt. The face is damaged, the left arm is missing, part of kilt is missing and the left leg and right foot restored.

The back pillar of the statue is inscribed with hieroglyphic inscriptions bearing his name, titles and prayers to gods Amun, Mut and Khonsu (the Theban Triad) together with god Min. The size of this statue is usually reserved for kings and gods, indicating that Horemheb was considered an elite.

Statue of Hor son of Ankh Khonsu

Statue of Hor son of Ankh Khonsu

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 25 – Ground Floor

Period: Third Intermediate Period

Dynasty: 25th dynasty (c. 712-653 BC)

Place of discovery: Thebes East, Karnak Temple (Ipet-Isut) Precinct of Amun, Court of the Cachette, Karnak Cachette.

Size: H. 51 cm

Material: Greywacke

This block statue is an example of a reintroduction of Middle Kingdom stylistic features, which is a characteristic element of the 25th Dynasty art. These statues depict their owners with their legs drawn tightly up against their chests and their arms folded on top of their knees. This block form would have protected them from damage since they were placed in temple gateways to ensure that the deceased would stay forever near the god and receive a part of the divine offerings and prayers. The head of the statue is projected from the body, probably to indicate the soul emerging from a mound in the underworld at the moment of rebirth.

This block statue depicts Hor, who was the son of Ankh-khonsu and a Prophet of Montu, and was dedicated to him by his grandson, also called Hor. His family was part of the Theban clergy for over five generations. It represents him seated on a low cushion with his legs drawn tightly up against his torso and his right forearm crossed over the left, where his hands hold rolls of cloth or papyri. He is wearing a beautifully engraved double wig, a long kilt and an inscribed belt. His face is thin with almond-shaped eyes, a hollow nose and big ears projecting from the double wig. The chin is supported and attached to the cubed body.

Six horizontal lines of hieroglyphic inscriptions are incised on his kilt together with one vertical line between his feet and one horizontal line goes around the base of the statue.

Statue of Psametik

Statue of Psametik

Statue of Psametik Protected

Statue of Psametik

Statue of Psametik Protected by goddess Hathor as a Cow

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 24- Ground Floor

Dynasty: 26th dynasty, reign of Ahmose II (Amasis) Khnumibre (c. 570-526 BC)

Place of discovery: Memphite Region, Saqqara North, Tomb of Psamtek 

Size: H 97.00 cm W 29.00 cm D/L 103.00 cm

Material: Greywacke

This statue of goddess Hathor was discovered together with two other statues of goddess Isis JE 38929 and god Osiris JE 38928 in the tomb of Psamtek, a high official of the late 26th Dynasty, who bears many titles as the Overseer of the Seals and the Governor of the Palace. These three statues are superb examples of their era, specifically the reintroduction of Old Kingdom stylistic features such as the smooth and rounded surfaces that contrast with the very hard stone.

Hathor is normally depicted as a cow or a woman wearing horns or cow ears and was worshiped throughout Egypt from the early Predynastic period as a member of the divine triad of Dendera together with Horus-Behdety and their son Ihy. She was associated with joy, beauty, dance and life, and carried many titles including Mistress of Life and Lady of Stars. Hathor was associated with motherhood as well as gems and precious materials, especially turquoise and gold. As Mistress of Turquoise, she is associated with a number of turquoise mines in the Sinai that bear her name.

This sculpture of the deceased with the goddess Hathor, in the form of a cow, portrays similarities to New Kingdom royal statuary, and is no doubt inspired by the chapel from the Temple of Tuthmose III at Deir el-Bahri in Thebes JE 38574-5. The modelling of the goddess is elegant in its proportions with well-defined muscular features. Her horns are incorporated into her usual crown with sun-disk and uraeus, together with two feathers. She wears a necklace composed of numerous strings of small beads gathered at each end and threaded through two or larger circular beads with a menat counterweight on her back, an emblem sacred to Hathor. Psamtek, as a pendant of her necklace, emerges from under her protection, as indicated by her left foot forward. He wears a simple bag wig and a pendant, possibly a seal, of his own. His palms are placed on his long kilt, which is inscribed with his name and titles. In keeping with the style of the companion pieces, the offering prayer is inscribed around the base in hieroglyphics.

Statue of Osiris – god of the Afterlife

Statue of Osiris, god of the Afterlife

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 24 – Ground Floor

Period: Late Period

Dynasty: 26th Dynasty, reign of Ahmose II (Amasis) Khnumibre, (c. 570-526 BC)

Place of discovery: Memphite Region, Saqqara: North, Horemheb Area, Psamtek

Size: H 89.50 cm W 28.00 cm D/L 46.00 cm

Material: Greywacke

This statue of the god Osiris was found together with two companion statues of the goddesses Isis (JE 38929) and Hathor (JE 38927) in the tomb of Psamtek, a high official of the late 26th Dynasty, who bears many titles as the Overseer of the Seals and the Governor of the Palace. These three statues are superb examples of their era, specifically the reintroduction of Old Kingdom stylistic features such as the smooth and rounded surfaces that contrast with the very hard stone.

Osiris was the god of the deceased, master of the underworld, afterlife and lord of eternity. According to the Heliopolis Ennead, Osiris was the son of Geb and Nut, the god of the earth and the goddess of the sky respectively, and was one of at least four siblings. He was also the brother/husband of Isis, the goddess of motherhood, magic, fertility, healing and rebirth. His brother Seth was the god of war, chaos and storms; and his sister Nephthys, wife of Seth, assisted in funerary rites, working with her sister Isis in a protective role. In some versions of the mythology there is another brother, Horus the Elder (Horus the Great). Osiris was also the father of Horus (the younger).

According to Egyptian mythology, Osiris ruled Egypt, providing civilisation to his people through the knowledge of agriculture and the law. Seth was extremely jealous of his brother and killed him, dismembering and distributing the corpse throughout the many Nomes of Egypt. On the death of Osiris, Seth became king of Egypt with his sister/wife Nephthys. Isis mourned her husband, and with her great magical powers decided to find and bring him back to life. With the help of her sister Nephthys, Isis searched every Egyptian Nome, collecting the pieces of her husband’s corpse, reassembling and holding them together with linen wrappings. Isis breathed life back into his body to resurrected him and soon conceived their child Horus (the younger). Osiris then descended into the underworld, where he became its ruler.

This statue depicts Osiris sitting on a throne in a mummified form wearing a close-fitting enveloping garment, a divine beard attached to his chin, and the Atef crown flanked by two ostrich feathers, adorned with the uraeus cobra. He holds the royal crook and flail with his arms crossed on his chest. The base of the statue is inscribed with an offering prayer, while the back pillar of the statue is not inscribed.

Scribe statue of Amenhotp son of Hepu

Scribe statue of Amenhotp son of Hepu

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, , reign of Amenophis III

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Karnak

Size: H. 117 cm

Material: Granit

Seated Statue of Sennefer

Seated Statue of Sennefer

Granodiorite Seated Statue of

Seated Statue of Sennefer

Granodiorite Seated Statue of Sennefer, his Wife Senetnay and Daughter Mutnofret

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom Amenhotep II (ca. 1427-1400 BC) Aakheperure

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Karnak

Size: H. 126 cm, W. 70 cm; H. 120 cm, W. 75 cm

Material: Granodiorite

Statue of Ramses III between Horus and Seth

Statue of Ramses III between Horus and Seth

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 14 – Ground Floor

Period: N/A

Dynasty: N/A

Place of discovery: N/A

Size: H. 195 cm

Material: N/A

N/A

Colossal Statue of Ramses II

Colossal Statue of Ramses II

Colossal Statue of Ramses

Colossal Statue of Ramses II

Colossal Statue of Ramses II

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 48 – Ground Floor

Period: N/A

Dynasty: N/A

Place of discovery: N/A

Size: N/A

Material: N/A

N/A

Colossal Quartzite Statue of Tutankhamun

Colossal Quartzite Statue of Tutankhamun, Usurped by Ay and Horemheb

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, Tutankhamun (ca. 1336-1327 BC)

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Temple of Ay and Horemheb Royal Memorial Temples Thebes

Size: H. 300 cm, W 73 cm D/L 87 cm

Material: Quartzite

Fragment of pavement

Fragment of pavement

Fragment of pavement depicting

Fragment of pavement

Fragment of pavement depicting ducks in papyrus marsh

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, Amenophis IV

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Tell El-Amarna

Size: H. 100 cm W. 160 cm

Material: Plaster

Coffin of Akhenaten

Coffin of Akhenaten

Coffin of Akhenaten Artefact

Coffin of Akhenaten

Coffin of Akhenaten

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: N/A

Place of discovery: N/A

Size: N/A

Material: N/A

Three Canopic Jars of Kiya with Human-headed Stopper

Three Canopic Jars of Kiya with Human-headed Stopper

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, Tutankhamun Nebkheperure (ca. 1336-1327 BC)

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: KV 55, Amarna Cache, Valley of the Kings

Size: H 52.90 cm , Dm 23.30 cm

Material: Calcite

Limestone Relief of Akhenaten

Limestone Relief of Akhenaten

Limestone Relief of Akhenaten,

Limestone Relief of Akhenaten

Limestone Relief of Akhenaten, Nefertiti and Two Princesses Worshipping the Aten

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten (ca. 1353-1336 BC)

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Royal Tomb Royal el-Amarna (Akhetaten) Middle Egypt

Size: H 52.00 cm W 48.00 cm D/L 8.00 cm

Material: Limestone 

Head of princess, daughter of Akhenaten

Head of princess, daughter of Akhenaten

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Tell El-Amarna

Size: H. 21 cm

Material: Quartzite

Bust of Akhenaten, Amonhotep IV

Bust of Akhenaten, Amonhotep IV

Bust of Akhenaten, Amonhotep

Bust of Akhenaten, Amonhotep IV

Bust of Akhenaten, Amonhotep IV

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 –  Ground Floor

Period: N/A

Dynasty: N/A

Place of discovery: N/A

Size: H. 140 cm

Material: Sandstone

Statue of Queen Tiye usurped by Henntawy

Statue of Queen Tiye usurped by Henntawy

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 –  Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: N/A

Place of discovery: Mut Temple, Karnak

Size: H. 160 cm – W. 44 cm

Material: Black granite

Colossus of Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten

Colossus of Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten

Colossus of Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten

Colossus of Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten

Colossus of Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten in the Khat and Double Crown

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 3 –  Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, Reign of Akhenaten (1350 – 1333 BC)

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Karnak Temple

Size: Height: 239 cm – Width: 86 cm – Length/Depth: 52 cm

Material: Sandstone

Head from statuette of Queen Tiye

Head from statuette of Queen Tiye

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 48 –  Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Serabit El-Khadim

Size: H. 206.5 cm – W. 110 cm

Material: Steatite

Seated Statue of Thutmose IV and His Mother, Tiaa

Seated Statue of Thutmose IV and His Mother, Tiaa

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 –  Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, Thutmose IV Menkheperure (ca. 1400-1390 BC)

Dynasty: N/A

Place of discovery: South Court Karnak Temple

Size: H 111.50 cm W 68.20 cm D/L 80.70 cm

Material: Granodiorite

Statue of Amenhotep II

Statue of Amenhotep II

Statue of Amenhotep II

Statue of Amenhotep II

Statue of Amenhotep II Protected by Meretseger

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 –  Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Karnak Temple, Found in 1907

Size: H. 150 cm

Material: Granodiorite

Seated statue of Queen Isis dedicated by her son King Tuthmosis III

Seated statue of Queen Isis dedicated by her son King Tuthmosis III

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 –  Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Karnak Cachette

Size: H. 98.5 cm – W. 25 cm  – L. 52.5 cm

Material: Granite

Statue of Amenhotep II holding offering table

Statue of Amenhotep II holding offering table

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, reign of Amenhotep II

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Karnak Cachette

Size: H.120 cm

Material: Granite

Statues of Tuthmosis III

Statues of Tuthmosis III

Diorite Statue of Tuthmose

Statues of Tuthmosis III

Diorite Statue of Tuthmose III, Kneeling with Nu-Jars in his Hands

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, reign of Thutmose III

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Karnak Cachette

Size: H. 135 cm

Material: Diorite

Statue of Tuthmosis III, trampling nine bows.

Statue of Tuthmosis III, trampling nine bows.

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: Dynasty 18

Place of discovery: Karnak Cachette

Size: H 200.00 cm

Material: Greywacke

Statue of Senenmut with the Princess Nefrure

Grey Granite Block Statue of Senenmut with the Princess Nefrure

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom, Hatshepsut (ca. 1473-1458 BC)

Dynasty: Dynasty 18

Place of discovery: Karnak Cachette, Excavated by G. Legrain for the EAS (Egyptian Antiquities Service) in 1904

Size: H 130.00 cm W 34.00 cm D/L 50.00 cm

Material: Grey Granite

Sarcophagus of Queen Hatshepsut

Sarcophagus of Queen Hatshepsut

Sarcophagus of Queen Hatshepsut

Sarcophagus of Queen Hatshepsut

Sarcophagus of Queen Hatshepsut

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 28 – Ground Floor

Period: N/A

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Valley of The Kings

Size: H. 100 cm – W. 87.5 cm – L. 245 cm

Material: Sandstone

Four Fragments of Queen Hatshepsut’s Expedition to the Land of Punt

Five fragments of Queen Hatshepsut’s expedition to the land of Punt.

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty (ca. 1550–1295 BC)

Place of discovery: Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut Deir el-Bahri Thebes, MMA (The Metropolitan Museum of Art) in 1928

Size: H 62.00 cm W 33.00 cm D/L 108.00 cm

Material: Painted Limestone

These fragments are part of a large relief wall commissioned by  queen Hatshepsut to commemorate an important trade expedition sent by the queen to Punt, a country situated somewhere on the Red Sea coast south of  Egypt, probably in the region of present-day Somalia/Eritrea. This expedition sent in order to obtain exotic goods for her  treasury and her pleasure – exotic animals, gold, incense materials, ebony and even trees for the temple garden. One of the relief depicts king Parehu and queen Ati. The king is  very slender and wears a kilt with a long sash, two under-tassels and a dagger tucked into the waistband. His long, slender  beard distinguishes him as a foreigner. The queen is excessively overweight with extreme curvature of the spine, rolls of fat on arms, body and legs. She wears a sleeveless dress, belted at the waist, a necklace with large disk beads, bracelets and anklets. On the right edge is a partial depiction of two rows of gold rings in baskets and a third of undetermined identification.

Painted Limestone Sphinx of Hatshepsut

Painted Limestone Sphinx of Hatshepsut

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 11 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty (ca. 1550–1295 BC)

Place of discovery: Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut Deir el-Bahri Thebes, MMA (The Metropolitan Museum of Art) in 1928

Size: Height: 62 cm, width: 33 cm, Depth: 108cm

Material: Painted Limestone

The body of this sphinx of Hatshepsut, as pharaoh, is rendered in typical style with the front legs extending forward and the tail curling around the right rear leg. The style of the head, however, pays homage to characteristics of those of the late 12th dynasty, effecting a more leonine quality by replacing the usual nemes crown with a thick, stylized mane. The neatly-arranged fur covers her head, meeting the forehead with a broad band. The mane also frames her face ending at the long false beard and extends down the from the legs to the “elbows”. Her face reflects the typical elements of her portraits: delicate and feminine, with large “half-moon” eyes and high, arched brows, both of which extend in a long cosmetic line. The nose (broken) is slim and the mouth small with a hint of a prim smile. The ingenuous character of the face stands in stark contrast with the power exuded by the leonine aspects of the sculpture. A line of inscription extending from just below the beard to the base between the paws reads: “Maatkare [her coronation name], beloved of Amun, endowed with life forever.” Traces of the blue and yellow paint can be seen. This sphinx, the embodiment of the power and might of the pharaoh, is thought to have been placed at the ramp between the lower and middle terraces at her temple at Deir el-Bahri.

Sphinx statue of Hatshepsut

Sphinx statue of Hatshepsut

Sphinx statue of Hatshepsut

Sphinx statue of Hatshepsut

Sphinx statue of Hatshepsut

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 7

Period: N/A

Dynasty: N/A

Place of discovery: N/A

Size: H.145 cm – W.260 cm

Material: Red granite

Tetisheri Stela

Tetisheri Stela

“Tetisheri Stela” – Limestone

Tetisheri Stela

"Tetisheri Stela" - Limestone Round-Topped Stela of Tetisheri with Ahmose I

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 12 – Ground Floor

Period: New Kingdom

Dynasty: 18th Dynasty (ca. 1550–1295 BC)

Place of discovery: Abydos, Excavated by W.M.F. Petrie for the EEF (Egypt Exploration Fund) in 1903

Size: Height: 226 cm, width: 106 cm

Material: Limestone

This commemorative stela, bears a vignette and inscription dedicated to queen Tetisheri, the maternal grandmother of king Ahmose who founded the mighty 18th dynasty. It is topped by a winged disk incorporating two cobras, a symbol of royal protection. The vignette consists of a mirror image of an almost identical scene in which the king makes offering to the queen. She is seated on a throne on a dais holding, in both instances in her left hand, a fly whisk, a common accoutrement for royal women, and she wears plain sheath dress and broad collar. Her head is adorned with the vulture crown, identifying her as mother to the heir to the throne, to which is added two plumes (probably ostrich). Her right hand is extended to receive the various offerings of food and cosmetics. King Ahmose stands, in both instances, behind the tables with his right hand in a gesture that indicates the giving of the offerings. In his left hand he holds his stick and a mace with a pear-shaped head. He wears a simple kilt with an fringed apron and the royal tail accoutrement. The artist has made some minor adjustments to the symmetrical arrangement (a common device in Egyptian art) in order to maintain the verisimilitude of the ritual – the whisk is always held in the left hand and the gestures here are properly made with the right.

The staff is carried, as usual, in the left hand; however, the mace was generally depicted in the right hand, ready to defend, but here, the king has retired it to his left in deference to his presentation to his esteemed grandmother. The inscriptions in the vignette give the names and titles of the king and queen, while the 17 preserved lines below refer to the creation of offerings for Tetisheri’s shrine in Abydos, where this stela was found, and the intention of the king to build her a pyramid and temple, the remains of which can be identified on a terrace near the cliffs.

Painted Limestone Funerary Stela of Amenemhat with His Wife Iy, and Intef and his wife Hepyt.

Painted Limestone Funerary Stela of Amenemhat with His Wife Iy, and Intef and his wife Hepyt.

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 21 – Ground Floor

Period: Middle Kingdom

Dynasty: 11th Dynasty (ca. 2125–1985 BC)

Place of discovery: Asasif, Excavated by A. Lansing for the MMA (The Metropolitan Museum of Art) in 1915

Size: Height: 30 cm, width: 50 cm

Material: Painted Limestone

Rectangular funerary stela with four people. Three on a bench at left, female and male, with beard, embracing another male, who is placed between them. The name Intef between the men faces the same direction as the bearded man. To the right of this group is an offering table with foodstuffs and jars beneath. Another female inscribed as “his sister Hepyt « stands to the right of the table. Both males wear white kilts and green collars and bracelets, have short wigs and one on right with beard. The women wear white sheath dresses and green collars, bracelets and anklets. Male skin tone red/brown, female yellow/beige. Mirror in fitted case under the chair of woman on left. Offering prayer inscribed above in green.

Block statue of Hetep

Block statue of Hetep

Limestone Block Statue of

Block statue of Hetep

Limestone Block Statue of Hetep

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 22 – Ground Floor

Period: Middle Kingdom

Dynasty: 12th Dynasty (ca. 1985–1773 BC)

Place of discovery: Saqqara, Excavated by C. Firth for the EAS (Egyptian Antiquities Service) in 1921

Size: Height: 110cm, width: 63 cm, Depth: 96 cm

Material: Limestone

The genre known as block statues originated during the Middle Kingdom and became increasingly popular in subsequent periods. This example is one of two commissioned by Hetep, each virtually identical but one was sculpted in limestone (this example) and the other in granite. The reason for the style is unclear: it may have been simply a way to produce a required image at minimal time and cost. Hetep is represented as sitting in a sedan chair, the type that was carried by means of poles attached for several men to lift and carry. Passengers would sit on a cushion and bend the legs, as the litters were not designed to stretch out the legs. The poles are eliminated here but the curved back is portrayed. Hetep’s arms are modeled in high relief, crossed over at the top of the block. His legs, also in high relief, emerge from the block at front and his feet rest on the bottom of the chair. He wears a flaring wig that shows his ears, and a false beard of formality. The ears are large and the eyes wide open and wide set, in keeping with the style of the time. His nose and mouth are damaged. The inscriptions that are carved vertically on the front sides of the chair and continue at the base give his name and titles and the offering prayer.

Ka statue of king AuibreHor

Ka statue of king AuibreHor

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 11 – Ground Floor

Period: Middle Kingdom

Dynasty: 13th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Dahshur

Size: 77 X 27 X 170 cm

Material: Wood, Gold Leaf and semi-precious stone

Sphinx of Amenemhat III

Sphinx of Amenemhat III

Sphinx of Amenemhat III

Sphinx of Amenemhat III

Sphinx of Amenemhat III

Artefact Details

Gallery number: 16 – Ground Floor

Period: Middle Kingdom, Reign of Amenemhet III (1831- 1786 BC)

Dynasty: 12th Dynasty

Place of discovery: Tanis

Size: H. 150 cm, L. 233 cm

Material: Gray Granite

Seated statue of Queen Nofret

Seated statue of Queen Nofret

Granodiorite Seated Statue of

Seated statue of Queen Nofret

Granodiorite Seated Statue of Queen Nofret, wife of Senusert II, in Hathor Wig

Artefact Details